RIP Vicky Worthington

Vicky was so tiny I could hold her in one hand. But despite being pint sized, she could quietly, and with certainty, command a room. She emanated sweetness and gentleness and from the first time I held her, it felt like I was holding purity in my arms. She was so petite and physically fragile, teetering along on her dainty little legs, crossing one in front of the other as she went. No doubt many a catwalk model would have envied her style. Even though it must have felt as though she was living in the land of the giants, Vicky had the confidence to approach people and in her cute little way, request affection and attention.

On one occasion we were at the park, and Vicky walked straight up to a man who was resting on a bench seat. In her delicate but definite way, she made it clear that she wanted to connect. And of course, he couldn't resist.

There was another occasion when the three of us (Cindy, Vicky and myself) went to a friend's house for a movie night. My friend has a gorgeous big black Labrador who is the perfect gentleman and a charming K9 host. Without question he accepted the girl's seniority and didn't say woof when they both claimed his very plush, very big bed for the evening. Even though I had brought across their own bed to rest in, clearly his was more inviting. The natural hierarchy was respected. This situation was repeated on a second visit. Kudos to the pooches. Nothing but harmony between them.

Vicky was the quintessential lap dog. Her two favourite places to be were on the lap of the nearest human or nestled in beside Cindy. She was born to be with others.

What a brave little lady she was to make her way down to Melbourne from Mildura and spend her final weeks in the big smoke. I think Vicky just wanted a taste of city life before calling it a day. Her time in Melbourne was jam packed full of love, cuddles and appreciation for her ability to open up people's hearts. She reflected softness and that felt like the most beautiful reminder of how we can walk through life ourselves.

I am so glad I had the opportunity to meet and care for Vicky. There is nothing to feel sadness about here. It was clear that Vicky chose when she wanted to go and it was our job to honour that. She knew Cindy would be fine and that she was leaving Cindy in a loving place, surrounded by humans who would take the upmost care of her and adore her without reservation. And that is exactly what is transpiring.

Thank you, Vicky, for all the love you brought to those who met you.

  • Vicky,
  • Vicky,
  • Vicky,